Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo

I was hoping for some non-sensical Russian-like grammatical mistakes would be corrected, but nah, male Morozova, otkazat’sya were all there. Although nobody was getting drunk on kvas at least, or did I miss it?

I’ll definitely watch the next season.
_____
2.5 stars

It is alright, if you are into fantasy lite. I, on the other hand, am a little weary of this lightish, breezy and superficial entertainment. Give me something juicier, something more thoughtful, something more sophisticated.

is a decent book. Bardugo’s writing style is easy and engaging. The plot is developed enough to masquerade the fact that the biggest chunk of it is the usual boarding school fare with makeovers, mean girl drama, petty rivalries, balls and a bit of steamy(ish) romance with the hottest guy on the block. Bardugo even succeeds at creating an “exotic” backdrop for her story – an early 20th century Russia-inspired fantasy land of Ravka. Even with my issues concerning the accuracy of everything borrowed from Russian culture, I will still say that the author manages to create a very distinct atmosphere in her novel. And speaking of this atmosphere, Russian “flavor” if you will,

With that said, the reason I did not enjoy this book the way I had hoped I would is that it is just so uncomplicated and straight-forward. I have no usual complaints about Bardugo’s characters and the plot. But they are familiar and well used and not very rich. These characters are simple, void of complex emotions and motivations. Same goes for the plot and conflicts. There is no complexity to them either. The conflicts are of good/evil variety. The plot is easily predictable. Twists? What twists?

I do not think

Now, to the part of my review that will reflect exclusively my personal problems with this book, which will not bother 99.9% of its potential readers.

is, as I mentioned earlier, a Russia-inspired fantasy. I took pains to check out Leigh Bardugo’s website, to see how exactly she addressed this inspiration. Here are her words: “Ravka and its language were heavily inspired by Russia, but with a few deliberate exceptions, the words and place names in Shadow & Bone are my own invention. My goal was to keep things simple and to make sure that Ravkan words still had resonance for readers. In short, I took a lot of liberties and I hope the purists won’t beat me about the head and shoulders.”

Sure, I do not want to be a language nazi or anything. I can skim over Russian-sounding made-up words, even though they linguistically do not make much sense. Not every writer can be like

For instance, if you want to give your characters Russian names, it is not that hard to find out that men and women in Russia have different variations of the same last name? Let’s take the book’s main character, Alina Starkov. Starkov is a masculine version of the last name. Correctly, it should be Alina Starkova. In the same way, there is another character, whose name is Ilya Morozova. The problem with this name is that Ilya is actually a male name, while the last name has a female form. In the book, Ilya Morozova is a “she.” If you google “Russian last names,” this information comes up in the second or third link from the top. How much time would it take to do this research?

Then there is a matter of “kvas,” a beverage everyone seems to get drunk on in

And, I swear, the last example (of many on my list). The name of this trilogy – The Grisha (in the book, the Grisha are magic wielding army). Grisha is actually a short form of the male name Grigori. Come on now, no better ideas, no better words to call your magicians other than this random personal name? Or “otkazat’sya,” which in Bardugo’s interpretation means “The Abandoned.” In reality “otkazat’sya” is a verb which translates into “to refuse.” That is why I am saying that even the words made up by the author make no sense, linguistically.

To be sure, all these things will not bother anyone except select few, but I do not think it is too wrong to expect the author who builds her whole magical universe using Russian culture, to respect this culture enough to do a cursory google search, to give her work some appearance of credibility and care? This sloppy use of a foreign (my) culture affected my enjoyment of the novel.

is not an isolated example of a lazy handling of Russian language and culture, and very often I feel very much compelled to offer authors, who choose to base their stories on Russia, my help, to at least check the spelling of the words. But then I see that they do not care to do the most basic of researches, so why should I care?

To wrap this up, I do not recommend against reading

Seeing a lot of traffic here, even though this review is almost 10 years old. Like everyone, I’ve watched the show, and I think it’s twice better than this sad, mediocre book. Mixing up Shadow and Bone and Six of Crows was a stroke of genius to be sure. The cast was all marvelous (especially Jesper), Mal was surprisingly attractive, as was Darkling. Color me surprised.I was hoping for some non-sensical Russian-like grammatical mistakes would be corrected, but nah, male Morozova, otkazat’sya were all there. Although nobody was getting drunk on kvas at least, or did I miss it?I’ll definitely watch the next season._____2.5 starsIt is alright, if you are into fantasy lite. I, on the other hand, am a little weary of this lightish, breezy and superficial entertainment. Give me something juicier, something more thoughtful, something more sophisticated. Shadow and Bone is a decent book. Bardugo’s writing style is easy and engaging. The plot is developed enough to masquerade the fact that the biggest chunk of it is the usual boarding school fare with makeovers, mean girl drama, petty rivalries, balls and a bit of steamy(ish) romance with the hottest guy on the block. Bardugo even succeeds at creating an “exotic” backdrop for her story – an early 20th century Russia-inspired fantasy land of Ravka. Even with my issues concerning the accuracy of everything borrowed from Russian culture, I will still say that the author manages to create a very distinct atmosphere in her novel. And speaking of this atmosphere, Russian “flavor” if you will, Shadow and Bone is a rare book whose covers (both US and UK) reflect the novel’s mood well, even though I find UK’s tagline to be a bit misleading and melodramatic. This novel is not as romancey as the line “A dark heart. A pure soul. A love that will last forever” would imply.With that said, the reason I did not enjoy this book the way I had hoped I would is that it is just so uncomplicated and straight-forward. I have no usual complaints about Bardugo’s characters and the plot. But they are familiar and well used and not very rich. These characters are simple, void of complex emotions and motivations. Same goes for the plot and conflicts. There is no complexity to them either. The conflicts are of good/evil variety. The plot is easily predictable. Twists? What twists?I do not think Shadow and Bone is a good fit for many adult readers, unless they are in a search for going-through-the-motions sort of story with a standard “kick-ass” protagonist (I am thinking Tris from Divergent or Ismae from Grave Mercy ), and they do not expect to be challenged intellectually or emotionally.Now, to the part of my review that will reflect exclusively my personal problems with this book, which will not bother 99.9% of its potential readers. Shadow and Bone is, as I mentioned earlier, a Russia-inspired fantasy. I took pains to check out Leigh Bardugo’s website, to see how exactly she addressed this inspiration. Here are her words: “Ravka and its language were heavily inspired by Russia, but with a few deliberate exceptions, the words and place names in Shadow & Bone are my own invention. My goal was to keep things simple and to make sure that Ravkan words still had resonance for readers. In short, I took a lot of liberties and I hope the purists won’t beat me about the head and shoulders.”Sure, I do not want to be a language nazi or anything. I can skim over Russian-sounding made-up words, even though they linguistically do not make much sense. Not every writer can be like Catherynne M. Valente, who embraced Russianness so fully in her Deathless, that I had to do some research to find out if she was Russian herself (she is not). But is it too much to ask of an author to at least google the actual Russian words she does use in her work? I swear, it would only take 10 minutes to research the glaring mistakes I found.For instance, if you want to give your characters Russian names, it is not that hard to find out that men and women in Russia have different variations of the same last name? Let’s take the book’s main character, Alina Starkov. Starkov is a masculine version of the last name. Correctly, it should be Alina Starkova. In the same way, there is another character, whose name is Ilya Morozova. The problem with this name is that Ilya is actually a male name, while the last name has a female form. In the book, Ilya Morozova is a “she.” If you google “Russian last names,” this information comes up in the second or third link from the top. How much time would it take to do this research?Then there is a matter of “kvas,” a beverage everyone seems to get drunk on in Shadow and Bone. In reality, you can not actually get drunk consuming it. This is a non-alcoholic beverage (well, almost, it occasionally has alcohol content up to 1%) which is given to children as well as adults, like, let’s say, soda. Wiki this word, I am not lying. You want to write about alcohol, use “pivo” or “braga” or “samogon,” if researching that is too hard, use “vodka.”And, I swear, the last example (of many on my list). The name of this trilogy – The Grisha (in the book, the Grisha are magic wielding army). Grisha is actually a short form of the male name Grigori. Come on now, no better ideas, no better words to call your magicians other than this random personal name? Or “otkazat’sya,” which in Bardugo’s interpretation means “The Abandoned.” In reality “otkazat’sya” is a verb which translates into “to refuse.” That is why I am saying that even the words made up by the author make no sense, linguistically.To be sure, all these things will not bother anyone except select few, but I do not think it is too wrong to expect the author who builds her whole magical universe using Russian culture, to respect this culture enough to do a cursory google search, to give her work some appearance of credibility and care? This sloppy use of a foreign (my) culture affected my enjoyment of the novel. Shadow and Bone is not an isolated example of a lazy handling of Russian language and culture, and very often I feel very much compelled to offer authors, who choose to base their stories on Russia, my help, to at least check the spelling of the words. But then I see that they do not care to do the most basic of researches, so why should I care?To wrap this up, I do not recommend against reading Shadow and Bone. It is a light and engaging enough entertainment. In fact, after reading a few Goodreads reviews, it looks like many people found it to be utterly enchanting. I am glad they do. I, however, will not be back for more.

Source: https://thangvi.com
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